Pipeline Whistleblower Reveals Dangerous “Culture of Noncompliance”by Lauren McCauley, commondreams.org

A “culture of noncompliance” and “coercion” dictate building practices at TransCanada Corporation—the company behind the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline—carrying “significant public safety risks,” declared former employee Evan Vokes
Vokes who was testifying before a Canadian Senate committee last week warned, “It’s organized crime, in my opinion.”
Vokes, an expert in pipeline welding and now whistleblower against his former employer, told The Huffington Post after the hearing, “The source of revenue is legal, but how they go about it isn’t legal.”
Vokes, a five year employee of TransCanada, was fired without cause in 2012 after repeatedly raising concerns about the company’s safety practices. In particular, he provided the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources with a number of documented violations of welding and pressure testing codes.
"What I have documented is a mix of politics and commercial interests that has resulted in the false public claims of exceptional industry practice when the reality is that industry struggles to comply with code and regulation," Vokes told the Senate committee.

Read more and see Evan Vokes’ testimony at the State Department here.

Pipeline Whistleblower Reveals Dangerous “Culture of Noncompliance”
by Lauren McCauley, commondreams.org

A “culture of noncompliance” and “coercion” dictate building practices at TransCanada Corporation—the company behind the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline—carrying “significant public safety risks,” declared former employee Evan Vokes

Vokes who was testifying before a Canadian Senate committee last week warned, “It’s organized crime, in my opinion.”

Vokes, an expert in pipeline welding and now whistleblower against his former employer, told The Huffington Post after the hearing, “The source of revenue is legal, but how they go about it isn’t legal.”

Vokes, a five year employee of TransCanada, was fired without cause in 2012 after repeatedly raising concerns about the company’s safety practices. In particular, he provided the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources with a number of documented violations of welding and pressure testing codes.

"What I have documented is a mix of politics and commercial interests that has resulted in the false public claims of exceptional industry practice when the reality is that industry struggles to comply with code and regulation," Vokes told the Senate committee.

Read more and see Evan Vokes’ testimony at the State Department here.

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